Jun 21 2018

Thrip: 人工衛星、通信、防衛産業を狙うスパイ集団

シマンテックによる人工知能ベースの TAA(Targeted Attack Analytics)で、広範囲にわたる新しいスパイ活動が明らかになりました。

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Jun 19 2018

McAfee Labs – McAfee Blogs 2018-06-19 00:01:25

Every week we read about adversaries attacking their targets as part of online criminal campaigns. Information gathering, strategic advantage, and theft of intellectual property are some of the motivations. Besides these, we have seen during the past two years an increase in attacks in which adversaries are not shy of leaving a trail of destruction. One might wonder how to deal with these kinds of threats and where to start.

Sun Tzu’s The Art of War contains some great wisdom regarding the strategy of warfare. One of the most popular is the advice “If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle.”

Applying this advice to information security, let’s focus first on knowing yourself. Knowing yourself can roughly be divided into two parts:

  • What do I have that can be of value to an attacker?
  • How do I detect, protect, and correct any threats to my identified value?

Every company has a value, it takes only one criminal mind to see that and to attempt to exploit it. Ask yourself what the core of your business is, the secret sauce that people might be after, what will take you out of business, whom you are doing business with, who are your clients, etc.

Once you have identified your organization’s value, the second part of knowing yourself comes into play. You must understand where you to focus your defenses and invest in technology to detect and protect against threats.

After wrapping up the knowing yourself part, what can we learn from the enemy? Ask yourself “Who would likely be interested in attacking me?” By going through the list of known adversaries and cybercriminal groups, you can create a list based on which geographies and vectors they target and classify them by risk. Here is a simplified example:

Once you have your list and risk classification ready, you must next study the tactics, techniques, and procedures used by these adversaries. For mapping their techniques and associated campaigns, we use the MITRE Adversarial Tactics, Techniques, and Common Knowledge model (ATT&CK). The matrix covers hundreds of techniques, and can be applied for different purposes. In this case, we will focus on the risk versus mapping the defensive architecture.

In Q1 of 2018, we mapped the targeted attacks discovered by ourselves and our peers in the industry. The following example comes from one adversary we tracked, showing the techniques they used:

With MITRE’s Navigator tool you can select an actor or malware family. After making the selection, the boxes in the matrix show which techniques the actor or malware has used.

From these techniques we can learn how our environments protect against these techniques and where we have gaps. The goal is not to create coverage or signatures for each technique; the matrix helps organizations understand how attackers behave. Having more visibility into their methods leads us to the right responses, and helps us contain and eradicate attacks in a coordinated way. By comparing the multiple actors from your initial risk assessment, you can build the matrix from the perspective of high/medium/low risk and map it against your defenses.

Although some adversaries might not have a history of attacking you and your sector, it is still good to ask yourself “What if we were a target?” Would your environment create enough visibility to detect and deal with these techniques?

Statistics

When we looked at the first quarter, we noticed that the three techniques were the most popular in the category of Privilege Escalation:

  • Exploitation of vulnerability
  • Process injection
  • Valid accounts

To determine your coverage and detection capacity, you should ask if the exploits used completely new vulnerabilities (no patches available) or if they had existed for a while. Would your environment have the right patches installed or are you missing them and have to take action?

When we looked at the categories of Exfiltration and Command and Control, most campaigns exfiltrated their data over a control server channel using a common port. That translates to either TCP port 80 (HTTP) or TCP port 443 (HTTPS). We all use these ports from inside the network to communicate to the internet. What if all my other defenses would fail to discover the suspicious activity? Which defensive components in my network would be able to inspect the outgoing traffic and block or flag the exfiltration attempts?

Conclusion

In this post, we highlighted one approach and application of the ATT&CK model. There are many ways to apply it for red teaming, threat hunting, and other tasks. At McAfee we embrace the model and are applying it to different levels and purposes in our organization. We are not only using it but also contribute to the model by describing newly discovered techniques used by adversaries.

The post Apply MITRE’s ‘ATT&CK’ Model to Check Your Defenses appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

Jun 18 2018

FTC, Partners Help Small Businesses Stop Scams

Original release date: June 18, 2018

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has launched Operation Main Street, an effort with the Better Business Bureau (BBB) and law enforcement to educate small business owners on how to stop scams targeting their businesses. Accordingly, FTC released Scams and Your Small Business, a guide for businesses detailing how to avoid, identify, and report scams.

NCCIC encourages business owners and other consumers to review the FTC article and NCCIC's Resources for Small and Midsize Businesses.


This product is provided subject to this Notification and this Privacy & Use policy.


Jun 14 2018

Unintended Clipboard Paste Function in Windows 10 Leads to Information Leak in RS1

The McAfee Labs Advanced Threat Research team has been investigating the Windows 10 platform. We have submitted several vulnerabilities already and have disclosed our research to Microsoft. Please refer to our vulnerability disclosure policy for further details or the post from earlier this week on Windows 10 Cortana vulnerabilities.

Early last year, a trivial “information leak” was reported in Windows 10. This technique no longer works on most current builds of Windows 10, but a variation of this simple method works quite well on some versions of Windows 10, specifically RS1 (RedStone 1).

The issue is simple to describe and execute. For a local attack, you can use a physical keyboard; if there is a network vector that would allow one to remotely reach the Windows login screen (such as RDP), you can use the software-based keyboard accessible from the lock screen. On all versions of Windows 10, the “paste” function appears to be intentionally forbidden from the Windows lock screen, including the “Hey Cortana” function. The original finding demonstrated CTRL+V could be used to paste clipboard contents. This is now disabled, even on RS1. However, we have found a way to bypass this restriction using the keyboard shortcut CTRL + SHIFT + INSERT, allowing us to access in plain text the clipboard contents, whatever they may be. While we are continuing to explore this technique to force-copy functions (and access arbitrary content), for now we can access whatever happens to be copied. In the demo this is a password allowing login.


The post Unintended Clipboard Paste Function in Windows 10 Leads to Information Leak in RS1 appeared first on McAfee Blogs.