Trick or Treat! Google issues warning of critical Windows vulnerability in wild

Enlarge / Win32k.sys has some problems. Again.
Recently, Google’s Threat Analysis Group discovered a set of zero-day vulnerabilities in Adobe Flash and the Microsoft Windows kernel that were already being actively used by malware attacks against …

Enlarge / Win32k.sys has some problems. Again.

Recently, Google’s Threat Analysis Group discovered a set of zero-day vulnerabilities in Adobe Flash and the Microsoft Windows kernel that were already being actively used by malware attacks against the Chrome browser. Google alerted both Adobe and Microsoft of the discovery on October 21, and Adobe issued a critical fix to patch its vulnerability last Friday. But Microsoft has yet to patch a critical bug in the Windows kernel that allows these attacks to work—which prompted Google to publicly announce the vulnerabilities today.

“After 7 days, per our published policy for actively exploited critical vulnerabilities, we are today disclosing the existence of a remaining critical vulnerability in Windows for which no advisory or fix has yet been released,” wrote Neel Mehta and Billy Leonard of Google’s Threat Analysis Group.”This vulnerability is particularly serious because we know it is being actively exploited.”

The bug being exploited could allow an attacker to escape from Windows’ security sandbox. The sandbox, which normally allows only user-level applications to execute, lets programs execute without needing administrator access while isolating what it can access on the local system through a set of policies.

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Apple Release Security Update for iOS

Original release date: October 31, 2016

Apple has released a security update to address vulnerabilities in iOS. Exploitation of some of these vulnerabilities may allow a remote attacker to take control of an affected system.US-CERT encourages us…

Original release date: October 31, 2016

Apple has released a security update to address vulnerabilities in iOS. Exploitation of some of these vulnerabilities may allow a remote attacker to take control of an affected system.

US-CERT encourages users and administrators to review the Apple security page for iOS and apply the necessary update.


This product is provided subject to this Notification and this Privacy & Use policy.


New leak may show if you were hacked by the NSA

Enlarge (credit: Mustafa Al-Bassam)
Shadow Brokers—the name used by a person or group that created seismic waves in August when it published some of the National Security Agency’s most elite hacking tools—is back with a new leak that the group …

Enlarge (credit: Mustafa Al-Bassam)

Shadow Brokers—the name used by a person or group that created seismic waves in August when it published some of the National Security Agency's most elite hacking tools—is back with a new leak that the group says reveals hundreds of organizations targeted by the NSA over more than a decade.

"TheShadowBrokers is having special trick or treat for Amerikanskis tonight," said the Monday morning post, which was signed by the same encryption key used in the August posts. "Many missions into your networks is/was coming from these ip addresses."

Monday's leak came as former NSA contractor Harold Thomas Martin III remains in federal custody on charges that he hoarded an astounding 50 terabytes of NSA data in his suburban Maryland home. Much of the data included highly classified information such as the names of US intelligence officers and highly sensitive methods behind intelligence operations. Martin came to the attention of investigators looking into the Shadow Brokers' August leak. Anonymous people with knowledge of the investigation say they don't know what connection, if any, Martin has to the group or the leaks.

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How Valuable is Your Healthcare Data?

Health care is a hot topic in security right now. A quick search for “hospital ransomware” returns a laundry list of news reports on hospitals as targets of cyberattacks. However, it is not just ransomware that people need to worry about. In the re…

Health care is a hot topic in security right now. A quick search for “hospital ransomware” returns a laundry list of news reports on hospitals as targets of cyberattacks. However, it is not just ransomware that people need to worry about. In the report Health Warning: Cyberattacks Are Targeting the Health Care Industry, our McAfee Labs team digs into the dark underbelly of cybercrime and data loss involving health care records. In this case, the darkrefers to the dark web.

Following up on the Hidden Data Economy report, we looked further to see if medical data was showing up for sale. We found dark web vendors offering up medical data records by the tens of thousands. One database for sale offered information on 397,000 patients!

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These databases contained not only names, addresses, and phone numbers of patients, but also data about their health care insurance providers and payment card information.

What’s it worth?

Of course, for this to be worth a cybercriminal’s time, they must be able to profit from it. We are finding that health care records to be a bit less valuable than records such as payment card records that contain financial information. The going price for a single record of information on a user that includes name, Social Security number, birth date, account information such as payment card number (referred to as fullz in dark web lingo) can range from $14 to $25 per record. Medical records sell for a much lower price, anywhere from a fraction of a cent to around $2.50 per record.

Does this mean medical records are not as valuable? Although not as lucrative as fullz, medical record information has  higher value than just a username/password record when sold on the dark web. We think that sellers are trying to maximize their gain from the data theft. In one underground market forum, a seller listed 40,000 medical records for $500, but specifically removed the financial data and sold that separately.

Why is the health care industry a target?

Although there are regulations and guidelines for the health care industry to protect patient information, the industry itself faces many challenges. Foremost, the focus of the majority of health care workers is the treatment of patients. Because they are dealing with life and death situations, the equipment used to treat patients must be working and available at a moment’s notice. This means there is often little time to install a patch or an update on a piece of medical equipment. The equipment may also be running an outdated operating system that simply cannot be patched to protect against the latest threats. It is not uncommon to see medical equipment running on Windows 95. The medical industry is also subject to FDA regulations and approvals. There may be equipment that is approved by the FDA only on an older operating system and would need to be recertified if updated.

How do I stay safe?

Unfortunately, these data breaches are outside the control of the average person. Health care providers typically use the information they collect from you for your treatment, so you cannot withhold your home address or phone number. As a consumer, you need to be alert for health care data breaches that potentially impact you.

  • Pay attention to the news: Once discovered, medical data breaches tend to make the evening news. Even if you went to a health care provider only once to get an x-ray because you thought you broke your thumb and that provider experiences a data breach, odds are your information was compromised.
  • Monitor your credit score: A common use for resold information is the opening of credit cards or bank accounts. Subscribing to a credit-monitoring service will help you know if a new account has been opened without your knowledge.
  • Watch out for phishing: If your contact information has been stolen, you are almost certain to be the target of numerous phishing attempts. Keep an eye out for suspicious emails and text messages. You can read one of my previous blogs for tips on how to spot a phishing attempt.

The nature of today’s digital world can unfortunately cause our personal and private data to be leaked. If you stay vigilant, you can reduce the impact these breaches will have on your life.

Stay on top of the latest consumer and mobile security threats by following me and @IntelSec_Home on Twitter, and “Like” us on Facebook.

Stay Safe!

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