Pay-Per-Install Company Deceptively Floods Market with Unwanted Programs

For the past 18 months, McAfee Labs has been investigating a pay-per-install developer, WakeNet AB, responsible for spreading prevalent adware such as Adware-Wajam and Linkury. This developer has been active for almost 20 years and recently has used increasingly deceptive techniques to convince users to execute its installers. Our report is now available online. During […]

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For the past 18 months, McAfee Labs has been investigating a pay-per-install developer, WakeNet AB, responsible for spreading prevalent adware such as Adware-Wajam and Linkury. This developer has been active for almost 20 years and recently has used increasingly deceptive techniques to convince users to execute its installers. Our report is now available online.

During a 10-month period from September 2017 to June 2018, we observed more than 1.9 million detections in the wild and the generation of thousands of unique websites and URLs. McAfee product protections prevented millions of pieces of adware from being installed on customers’ machines.

 

McAfee Adware-InstCap detections from September 2017 to June 2018.

Some of the deceptive tactics we observed included fake movie playbacks and fake torrent downloads targeting both Windows and Mac systems. These tactics aimed to trick users into installing bundled applications such as performance cleaners.

WakeNet AB’s FileCapital tools are responsible for installing some of the most prevalent potentially unwanted program (PUP) families, which plague infected clients with unwanted advertisements and seriously impact performance.

The revenue WakeNet AB generated in one year puts it above some of the most prevalent ransomware families, which explains why creating PUPs is so appealing. PUP developers generate revenue primarily by exploiting PC users.

PUPs

A PUP is software that might offer some useful functionality to a customer but also presents some risk. Users see some PUPs as benign, others as malicious. One of the latter is Adware-Elex (aka Fireball), which infected 250 million devices. McAfee strives to protect its customers against all kinds of threats, including PUPs.

The McAfee PUP Policy helps users understand what is being installed on their systems and notifies them when a technology poses a risk to their systems or privacy. PUP detection and removal provides notification to our customers when a software program or technology lacks sufficient notification or control over the software, or fails to adequately gain user consent to the risks posed by the technology. For more on how McAfee defines and protects against PUPs, read the McAfee® Potentially Unwanted Programs Policy.

For a full analysis of WakeNet AB’s products, download the full report.

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Marriott breach leaves 500 million exposed with passport, card numbers stolen

Motivations of hackers are unclear, but proprietary Wi-Fi may have been a target.

W Hotel image

Enlarge / Marriott Hotel brands like the W hotel were breached between 2014 and 2018. (credit: Craig Warga/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

On Friday, Marriott International announced a system breach that has affected approximately 500 million customers, with stolen information including names, credit card numbers, mailing addresses, email addresses, and passport numbers. The breach is one of the largest in history, after recent Yahoo breaches that compromised the accounts of nearly three billion customers.

The breach appears to have originated at Starwood hotels in 2014—two years before Marriott acquired the hotel chain, according to The Washington Post. "When Marriott acquired Starwood in 2016, the existing breach went undetected during the merger and for years afterward," the Post noted.

Marriott says it confirmed unauthorized access to the Starwood guest reservation database on November 19, which contained guest information dating back to September 10, 2018. The hackers had allegedly copied encrypted information from the Starwood reservation database. When Marriott was able to decrypt the information, the company found that of the approximately 500 million guests that had their name and contact information stolen, a subset of 327 million had "some combination of name, mailing address, phone number, email address, passport number, Starwood Preferred Guest (“SPG”) account information, date of birth, gender, arrival and departure information, reservation date, and communication preferences."

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Malcom – Malware Communication Analyzer

Malcom is a Malware Communication Analyzer designed to analyze a system’s network communication using graphical representations of network traffic, and cross-reference them with known malware sources.

This comes handy when analyzing how certain malwar…

Malcom – Malware Communication Analyzer

Malcom is a Malware Communication Analyzer designed to analyze a system’s network communication using graphical representations of network traffic, and cross-reference them with known malware sources.

This comes handy when analyzing how certain malware species try to communicate with the outside world.

Malcom Malware Communication Analyzer Features

Malcom can help you:

  • Detect central command and control (C&C) servers
  • Understand peer-to-peer networks
  • Observe DNS fast-flux infrastructures
  • Quickly determine if a network artifact is ‘known-bad’

The aim of Malcom is to make malware analysis and intel gathering faster by providing a human-readable version of network traffic originating from a given host or network.

Read the rest of Malcom – Malware Communication Analyzer now! Only available at Darknet.

WepAttack – WLAN 802.11 WEP Key Hacking Tool

WepAttack is a WLAN open source Linux WEP key hacking tool for breaking 802.11 WEP keys using a wordlist based dictionary attack.

This tool is based on an active dictionary attack that tests millions of words to find the right key. Only one packet is …

WepAttack – WLAN 802.11 WEP Key Hacking Tool

WepAttack is a WLAN open source Linux WEP key hacking tool for breaking 802.11 WEP keys using a wordlist based dictionary attack.

This tool is based on an active dictionary attack that tests millions of words to find the right key. Only one packet is required to start an attack.

What is a WEP Key?

Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) is a security algorithm for IEEE 802.11 wireless networks. Introduced as part of the original 802.11 standard ratified in 1997, its intention was to provide data confidentiality comparable to that of a traditional wired network.[1] WEP, recognizable by its key of 10 or 26 hexadecimal digits (40 or 104 bits), was at one time widely in use and was often the first security choice presented to users by router configuration tools.

Read the rest of WepAttack – WLAN 802.11 WEP Key Hacking Tool now! Only available at Darknet.