Intel’s SGX blown wide open by, you guessed it, a speculative execution attack

Foreshadow explained in a video.[/url]
Another day, another speculative execution-based attack. Data protected by Intel’s SGX—data that’s meant to be protected even from a malicious or hacked kernel—can be read by an attacker thanks to leaks en…

Foreshadow explained in a video.[/url]

Another day, another speculative execution-based attack. Data protected by Intel's SGX—data that's meant to be protected even from a malicious or hacked kernel—can be read by an attacker thanks to leaks enabled by speculative execution.

Since publication of the Spectre and Meltdown attacks in January this year, security researchers have been taking a close look at speculative execution and the implications it has for security. All high-speed processors today perform speculative execution: they assume certain things (a register will contain a particular value, a branch will go a particular way) and perform calculations on the basis of those assumptions. It's an important design feature of these chips that's essential to their performance, and it has been for 20 years.

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libsodium – Easy-to-use Software Library For Encryption

Sodium is a new, easy-to-use software library for encryption, decryption, signatures, password hashing and more. It is a portable, cross-compilable, installable, packageable fork of NaCl, with a compatible API, and an extended API to improve usability …

libsodium – Easy-to-use Software Library For Encryption

Sodium is a new, easy-to-use software library for encryption, decryption, signatures, password hashing and more. It is a portable, cross-compilable, installable, packageable fork of NaCl, with a compatible API, and an extended API to improve usability even further.

Its goal is to provide all of the core operations needed to build higher-level cryptographic tools. Sodium supports a variety of compilers and operating systems, including Windows (with MingW or Visual Studio, x86 and x64), iOS, Android, as well as Javascript and Webassembly.

Read the rest of libsodium – Easy-to-use Software Library For Encryption now! Only available at Darknet.

From July on, Chrome will brand plain old HTTP as “Not secure”

Enlarge (credit: Indigo girl)
As more and more websites offer access over encrypted HTTPS, Chrome will soon brand any site served up over plain, unencrypted HTTP as “Not secure.” Chrome 68, due for release in July, will start sticking the “Not secur…

Enlarge (credit: Indigo girl)

As more and more websites offer access over encrypted HTTPS, Chrome will soon brand any site served up over plain, unencrypted HTTP as "Not secure." Chrome 68, due for release in July, will start sticking the "Not secure" label in the address bar, as a counterpart to the "Secure" label and padlock icon that HTTPS sites get.

This is a continuation of a change made in January of last year where Chrome would brand HTTP sites with password forms as being "Not secure."

Google says that 81 of the top 100 sites on the Web default to HTTPS and that 68 percent of Chrome traffic on Android and Windows uses HTTPS. As such, non-secure HTTP is becoming the exception, not the rule, justifying the explicit call-out. While HTTPS once required expensive certificates, projects such as Let's Encrypt have made it easy to add HTTPS to just about any site at zero cost.

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Skype finally getting end-to-end encryption

Enlarge (credit: Skype)
Since its inception, Skype has been notable for its secretive, proprietary algorithm. It’s also long had a complicated relationship with encryption: encryption is used by the Skype protocol, but the service has never been cle…

Enlarge (credit: Skype)

Since its inception, Skype has been notable for its secretive, proprietary algorithm. It's also long had a complicated relationship with encryption: encryption is used by the Skype protocol, but the service has never been clear exactly how that encryption was implemented or exactly which privacy and security features it offers.

That changes today in a big way. The newest Skype preview now supports the Signal protocol: the end-to-end encrypted protocol already used by WhatsApp, Facebook Messenger, Google Allo, and, of course, Signal. Skype Private Conversations will support text, audio calls, and file transfers, with end-to-end encryption that Microsoft, Signal, and, it's believed, law enforcement agencies cannot eavesdrop on.

Presently, Private Conversations are only available in the Insider builds of Skype. Naturally, the Universal Windows Platform version of the app—the preferred version on Windows 10—isn't yet supported. In contrast, the desktop version of the app, along with the iOS, Android, Linux, and macOS clients, all have compatible Insider builds. Private Conversations aren't the default and don't appear to yet support video calling. The latter limitation shouldn't be insurmountable (Signal's own app offers secure video calling). We hope to see the former change once updated clients are stable and widely deployed.

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