Pay-Per-Install Company Deceptively Floods Market with Unwanted Programs

For the past 18 months, McAfee Labs has been investigating a pay-per-install developer, WakeNet AB, responsible for spreading prevalent adware such as Adware-Wajam and Linkury. This developer has been active for almost 20 years and recently has used increasingly deceptive techniques to convince users to execute its installers. Our report is now available online. During […]

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For the past 18 months, McAfee Labs has been investigating a pay-per-install developer, WakeNet AB, responsible for spreading prevalent adware such as Adware-Wajam and Linkury. This developer has been active for almost 20 years and recently has used increasingly deceptive techniques to convince users to execute its installers. Our report is now available online.

During a 10-month period from September 2017 to June 2018, we observed more than 1.9 million detections in the wild and the generation of thousands of unique websites and URLs. McAfee product protections prevented millions of pieces of adware from being installed on customers’ machines.

 

McAfee Adware-InstCap detections from September 2017 to June 2018.

Some of the deceptive tactics we observed included fake movie playbacks and fake torrent downloads targeting both Windows and Mac systems. These tactics aimed to trick users into installing bundled applications such as performance cleaners.

WakeNet AB’s FileCapital tools are responsible for installing some of the most prevalent potentially unwanted program (PUP) families, which plague infected clients with unwanted advertisements and seriously impact performance.

The revenue WakeNet AB generated in one year puts it above some of the most prevalent ransomware families, which explains why creating PUPs is so appealing. PUP developers generate revenue primarily by exploiting PC users.

PUPs

A PUP is software that might offer some useful functionality to a customer but also presents some risk. Users see some PUPs as benign, others as malicious. One of the latter is Adware-Elex (aka Fireball), which infected 250 million devices. McAfee strives to protect its customers against all kinds of threats, including PUPs.

The McAfee PUP Policy helps users understand what is being installed on their systems and notifies them when a technology poses a risk to their systems or privacy. PUP detection and removal provides notification to our customers when a software program or technology lacks sufficient notification or control over the software, or fails to adequately gain user consent to the risks posed by the technology. For more on how McAfee defines and protects against PUPs, read the McAfee® Potentially Unwanted Programs Policy.

For a full analysis of WakeNet AB’s products, download the full report.

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WebCobra Malware Uses Victims’ Computers to Mine Cryptocurrency

The authors thank their colleagues Oliver Devane and Deepak Setty for their help with this analysis. McAfee Labs researchers have discovered new Russian malware, dubbed WebCobra, which harnesses victims’ computing power to mine for cryptocurrencies. Coin mining malware is difficult to detect. Once a machine is compromised, a malicious app runs silently in the background […]

The post WebCobra Malware Uses Victims’ Computers to Mine Cryptocurrency appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

The authors thank their colleagues Oliver Devane and Deepak Setty for their help with this analysis.

McAfee Labs researchers have discovered new Russian malware, dubbed WebCobra, which harnesses victims’ computing power to mine for cryptocurrencies.

Coin mining malware is difficult to detect. Once a machine is compromised, a malicious app runs silently in the background with just one sign: performance degradation. As the malware increases power consumption, the machine slows down, leaving the owner with a headache and an unwelcome bill, as the energy it takes to mine a single bitcoin can cost from $531 to $26,170, according to a recent report.

The increase in the value of cryptocurrencies has inspired cybercriminals to employ malware that steals machine resources to mine crypto coins without the victims’ consent.

The following chart shows how the prevalence of miner malware follows changes in the price of Monero cryptocurrency.

Figure 1: The price of cryptocurrency Monero peaked at the beginning of 2018. The total samples of coin miner malware continue to grow. Source: https://coinmarketcap.com/currencies/monero/.

McAfee Labs has previously analyzed the cryptocurrency file infector CoinMiner; and the Cyber Threat Alliance, with major assistance from McAfee, has published a report, “The Illicit Cryptocurrency Mining Threat.” Recently we examined the Russian application WebCobra, which silently drops and installs the Cryptonight miner or Claymore’s Zcash miner, depending on the architecture WebCobra finds. McAfee products detect and protect against this threat.

We believe this threat arrives via rogue PUP installers. We have observed it across the globe, with the highest number of infections in Brazil, South Africa, and the United States.

Figure 2: McAfee Labs heat map of WebCobra infections from September 9–13.

This cryptocurrency mining malware is uncommon in that it drops a different miner depending on the configuration of the machine it infects. We will discuss that detail later in this post.

Behavior

The main dropper is a Microsoft installer that checks the running environment. On x86 systems, it injects Cryptonight miner code into a running process and launches a process monitor. On x64 systems, it checks the GPU configuration and downloads and executes Claymore’s Zcash miner from a remote server.

Figure 3: WebCobra’s installation window.

After launching, the malware drops and unzips a password-protected Cabinet archive file with this command:

Figure 4: The command to unzip the dropped file.

The CAB file contains two files:

  • LOC: A DLL file to decrypt data.bin
  • bin: Contains the encrypted malicious payload

The CAB file uses the following script to execute ERDNT.LOC:

Figure 5: The script to load the DLL file, ERDNT.LOC.

ERDNT.LOC decrypt data.bin and passes the execution flow to it with this routine:

  • [PlainText_Byte] = (([EncryptedData_Byte] + 0x2E) ^ 0x2E) + 0x2E

Figure 6: The decryption routine. 

The program checks the running environment to launch the proper miner, shown in the following diagram:

Figure 7: Launching the proper miner depending on a system’s configuration.

Once data.bin is decrypted and executed, it tries a few anti-debugging, anti-emulation, and anti-sandbox techniques as well as checks of other security products running on the system. These steps allow the malware to remain undetected for a long time.

Most security products hook some APIs to monitor the behavior of malware. To avoid being found by this technique, WebCobra loads ntdll.dll and user32.dll as data files in memory and overwrites the first 8 bytes of those functions, which unhooks the APIs.

List of unhooked ntdll.dll APIs

  • LdrLoadDll
  • ZwWriteVirtualMemory
  • ZwResumeThread
  • ZwQueryInformationProcess
  • ZwOpenSemaphore
  • ZwOpenMutant
  • ZwOpenEvent
  • ZwMapViewOfSection
  • ZwCreateUserProcess
  • ZwCreateSemaphore
  • ZwCreateMutant
  • ZwCreateEvent
  • RtlQueryEnvironmentVariable
  • RtlDecompressBuffer

List of unhooked user32.dll APIs

  • SetWindowsHookExW
  • SetWindowsHookExA

Infecting an x86 system

The malware injects malicious code to svchost.exe and uses an infinite loop to check all open windows and to compare each window’s title bar text with these strings. This is another check by WebCobra to determine if it is running in an isolated environment designed for malware analysis.

  • adw
  • emsi
  • avz
  • farbar
  • glax
  • delfix
  • rogue
  • exe
  • asw_av_popup_wndclass
  • snxhk_border_mywnd
  • AvastCefWindow
  • AlertWindow
  • UnHackMe
  • eset
  • hacker
  • AnVir
  • Rogue
  • uVS
  • malware

The open windows will be terminated if any of preceding strings shows in the windows title bar text.

Figure 8: Terminating a process if the windows title bar text contains specific strings.

Once the process monitor executes, it creates an instance of svchost.exe with the miner’s configuration file specified as an argument and injects the Cryptonight miner code.

Figure 9: Creating an instance of svchost.exe and executing the Cryptonight miner.

Finally, the malware resumes the process with the Cryptonight miner running silently and consuming almost all the CPU’s resources.

Figure 10: An x86 machine infected with the Cryptonight miner. 

Infecting an x64 system

The malware terminates the infection if it finds Wireshark running.

Figure 11: Checking for Wireshark.

The malware checks the GPU brand and mode. It runs only if one of the following GPUs is installed:

  • Radeon
  • Nvidia
  • Asus

Figure 12: Checking the GPU mode.

If these checks are successful, the malware creates the following folder with hidden attributes and downloads and executes Claymore’s Zcash miner from a remote server.

  • C:\Users\AppData\Local\WIX Toolset 11.2

Figure 13: Requesting the download of Claymore’s Zcash miner.

Figure 14: Claymore’s miner.

Figure 15: Executing the miner with its configuration file.

Finally, the malware drops a batch file at %temp%\–xxxxx.cMD to delete the main dropper from [WindowsFolder]\{DE03ECBA-2A77-438C-8243-0AF592BDBB20}\*.*.

Figure 16: A batch file deleting the dropper.

The configuration files of the miners follow.

Figure 17: Cryptonight’s configuration file.

This configuration file contains:

  • The mining pool: 5.149.254.170
  • Username: 49YfyE1xWHG1vywX2xTV8XZzbzB1E2QHEF9GtzPhSPRdK5TEkxXGRxVdAq8LwbA2Pz7jNQ9gYBxeFPHcqiiqaGJM2QyW64C
  • Password: soft-net

Figure 18: Claymore’s Zcash miner configuration file.

This configuration file contains:

  • The mining pool: eu.zec.slushpool.com
  • Username: pavelcom.nln
  • Password: zzz

Coin mining malware will continue to evolve as cybercriminals take advantage of this relatively easy path to stealing value. Mining coins on other people’s systems requires less investment and risk than ransomware, and does not depend on a percentage of victims agreeing to send money. Until users learn they are supporting criminal miners, the latter have much to gain.

 

MITRE ATT&CK techniques

  • Exfiltration over command and control channel
  • Command-line interface
  • Hooking
  • Data from local system
  • File and directory discovery
  • Query registry
  • System information discovery
  • Process discovery
  • System time discovery
  • Process injection
  • Data encrypted
  • Data obfuscation
  • Multilayer encryption
  • File deletion

Indicators of compromise

IP addresses
  • 149.249.13:2224
  • 149.254.170:2223
  • 31.92.212
Domains
  • fee.xmrig.com
  • fee.xmrig.com
  • ru
  • zec.slushpool.com

McAfee detections

  • CoinMiner Version 2 in DAT Version 8986; Version 3 in DAT Version 3437
  • l Version 2 in DAT Version 9001; Version 3 in DAT Version 3452
  • RDN/Generic PUP.x Version 2 in DAT Version 8996; Version 3 in DAT Version 3447
  • Trojan-FQBZ, Trojan-FQCB, Trojan-FQCR Versions 2 in DAT Version 9011; Versions 3 in DAT Version 3462

Hashes (SHA-256)

  • 5E14478931E31CF804E08A09E8DFFD091DB9ABD684926792DBEBEA9B827C9F37
  • 2ED8448A833D5BBE72E667A4CB311A88F94143AA77C55FBDBD36EE235E2D9423
  • F4ED5C03766905F8206AA3130C0CDEDEC24B36AF47C2CE212036D6F904569350
  • 1BDFF1F068EB619803ECD65C4ACB2C742718B0EE2F462DF795208EA913F3353B
  • D4003E6978BCFEF44FDA3CB13D618EC89BF93DEBB75C0440C3AC4C1ED2472742
  • 06AD9DDC92869E989C1DF8E991B1BD18FB47BCEB8ECC9806756493BA3A1A17D6
  • 615BFE5A8AE7E0862A03D183E661C40A1D3D447EDDABF164FC5E6D4D183796E0
  • F31285AE705FF60007BF48AEFBC7AC75A3EA507C2E76B01BA5F478076FA5D1B3
  • AA0DBF77D5AA985EEA52DDDA522544CA0169DCA4AB8FB5141ED2BDD2A5EC16CE

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Fallout Exploit Kit Releases the Kraken Ransomware on Its Victims

Alexandr Solad and Daniel Hatheway of Recorded Future are coauthors of this post. Rising from the deep, Kraken Cryptor ransomware has had a notable development path in recent months. The first signs of Kraken came in mid-August on a popular underground forum. In mid-September it was reported that the malware developer had placed the ransomware, …

The post Fallout Exploit Kit Releases the Kraken Ransomware on Its Victims appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

Alexandr Solad and Daniel Hatheway of Recorded Future are coauthors of this post.

Rising from the deep, Kraken Cryptor ransomware has had a notable development path in recent months. The first signs of Kraken came in mid-August on a popular underground forum. In mid-September it was reported that the malware developer had placed the ransomware, masquerading as a security solution, on the website SuperAntiSpyware, infecting systems that tried to download a legitimate version of the antispyware software.

Kraken’s presence became more apparent at the end of September, when the security researcher nao_sec discovered that the Fallout Exploit Kit, known for delivering GandCrab ransomware, also started to deliver Kraken.

The McAfee Advanced Threat Research team, working with the Insikt group from Recorded Future, found evidence of the Kraken authors asking the Fallout team to be added to the Exploit Kit. With this partnership, Kraken now has an additional malware delivery method for its criminal customers.

We also found that the user associated with Kraken ransomware, ThisWasKraken, has a paid account. Paid accounts are not uncommon on underground forums, but usually malware developers who offer services such as ransomware are highly trusted members and are vetted by other high-level forum members. Members with paid accounts are generally distrusted by the community.

 

Kraken Cryptor’s developers asking to join the Fallout Exploit Kit.

Kraken Cryptor announcement.

The ransomware was announced, in Russian, with the following features:

  • Encoded in C# (.NET 3.5)
  • Small stub size ~85KB
  • Fully autonomous
  • Collects system information as an encrypted message for reference
  • File size limit for encryption
  • Encryption speed faster than ever
  • Uses a hybrid combination of encryption algorithms (AES, RC4, Salsa20) for secure and fast encryption with a unique key for each file
  • Enables the use of a network resource and adds an expansion bypass mode for encrypting all files on non-OS disks
  • Is impossible to recover data using a recovery center or tools without payment
  • Added antidebug, antiforensic methods

Kraken works with an affiliate program, as do ransomware families such as GandCrab. This business scheme is often referred to a Ransomware-as-a-Service (RaaS).

Affiliates are given a new build of Kraken every 15 days to keep the payload fully undetectable from antimalware products. According to ThisWasKraken, when a victim asks for a free decryption test, the affiliate member should send one of the victim’s files with its associated unique key to the Kraken Cryptor ransomware support service. The service will decrypt the file and resend it to the affiliate member to forward the victim. After the victim pays the full ransom, the affiliate member sends a percentage of the received payment to the RaaS developers to get a decryptor key, which is forwarded to the victim. This system ensures the affiliate pays a percentage to the affiliate program and does not simply pocket the full amount. The cut for the developers offers them a relatively safe way of making a profit without exposing themselves to the risk of spreading ransomware.

We have observed that the profit percentage for the developers has decreased from 25% in Version 1 to 20% in Version 2. The developers might have done this to attract more affiliates. To enter the program, potential affiliates must complete a form and pay $50 to be accepted.

In the Kraken forum post it states that the ransomware cannot be used in the following countries:

  • Armenia
  • Azerbaijan
  • Belarus
  • Estonia
  • Georgia
  • Iran
  • Kazakhstan
  • Kyrgyzstan
  • Latvia
  • Lithuania
  • Moldova
  • Russia
  • Tajikistan
  • Turkmenistan
  • Ukraine
  • Uzbekistan

On October 21, Kraken’s authors released Version 2 of the affiliate program, reflecting the ransomware’s popularity and a fresh release. At the same time, the authors published a map showing the distribution of their victims:

Note that some of the countries on the developers’ exclusion list have infections.

Video promotions

The first public release of Kraken Cryptor was Version 1.2; the latest is Version 2.07. To promote the ransomware, the authors created a video showing its capabilities to potential customers. We analyzed the metadata of the video and believe the authors created it along with the first version, released in August.

In the video, the authors show how fast Kraken can encrypt data on the system:

Kraken ransomware in action.

Actor indications

The Advanced Threat Research team and Recorded Future’s Insikt group analyzed all the forum messages posted by ThisWasKraken. Based on the Russian language used in the posts, we believe ThisWasKraken is neither a native Russian nor English speaker. To make forum posts in Russian, the actor likely uses an automated translation service, suggested by the awkward phrasing indicative of such a service. In contrast, the actor is noticeably more proficient in English, though they make mistakes consistently in both sentence structure and spelling. English spelling errors are also noticeable in the ransom note.

ThisWasKraken is likely part of a team that is not directly involved in the development of the ransomware. The actor’s role is customer facing, through the Jabber account [email protected][.]im. Communications with ThisWasKraken show that the actor refers all technical issues to the product support team at [email protected][.]com.

Payments

Bitcoin is the only currency the affiliate program uses. Insikt Group identified several wallets associated with the operation. Kraken’s developers appear to have choose BitcoinPenguin, an online gambling site as the primary money laundering conduit. It is very uncommon for criminal actors, and specifically ransomware operators, to bypass traditional cryptocurrency exchangers when laundering stolen funds. One of the decisive factors for the unusual choice was likely BitcoinPenguin’s lack of requiring identity verification by its members, allowing anyone to maintain an anonymous cryptocurrency wallet.

Although in response to regulatory demands cryptocurrency exchangers continue to stiffen their registration rules, online crypto casinos do not have to follow the same know-your-customer guidelines, providing a convenient loophole for all kinds of money launderers.

Bitcoin transactions associated with Kraken analyzed with the Crystal blockchain tool. The parent Bitcoin wallet is 3MsZjBte81dvSukeNHjmEGxKSv6YWZpphH.

Kraken Cryptor at work

The ransomware encrypts data on the disk very quickly and uses external tools, such as SDelete from the Sysinternals suite, to wipe files and make file recovery harder.

The Kraken Cryptor infection scheme.

The ransomware has implemented a user account control (UAC) bypass using the Windows Event Viewer. This bypass technique is used by other malware families and is quite effective for executing malware.

The technique is well explained in an article by blogger enigma0x3.

We analyzed an early subset of Kraken ransomware samples and determined they were still in the testing phase, adding and removing options. The ransomware has implemented a “protection” to delete itself during the infection phase:

“C:\Windows\System32\cmd.exe” /C ping 127.0.0.1 -n 3 > NUL&&del /Q /F /S “C:\Users\Administrator\AppData\Local\Temp\krakentemp0000.exe”

This step is to prevent researchers and endpoint protections from catching the file on an infected machine.

Kraken encrypts user files with a random name and drops the ransom note demanding the victim to pay to recover them. McAfee recommends not paying ransoms because doing so contributes to the development of more ransomware families.

Kraken’s ransom note.

Each file extension is different; this technique is often used by specific ransomware families to bypass endpoint protection systems.

Kraken delivered by the exploit kit bypasses the UAC using Event Viewer, drops a file on the system, and executes it through the UAC bypass method.

The binary delivered by the exploit kit.

The authors of the binary forgot during the compilation of the first versions to delete the PDB reference, revealing that the file has a relationship with Kraken Cryptor:

The early versions contained the following path:

C:\Users\Krypton\source\repos\UAC\UAC\obj\\Release\UAC.pdb.

Later versions dropped the PDB path together with the Kraken loader.

Using SysInternals tools

One unique feature of this ransomware family is the use of SDelete. Kraken uses a .bat file to perform certain operations, making file recovery much more challenging:

Kraken downloads SDelete from the Sysinternals website, adds the registry key accepting the EULA to avoid the pop-up, and executes it with the following arguments:

sdelete.exe -c -z C

The SDelete batch file makes file recovery much harder by overwriting all free space on the drive with zeros, deleting the Volume Shadow Copies, disabling the recovery reboot option and finally rebooting the system after 300 seconds.

Netguid comparison

The earlier versions of Kraken were delivered by a loader before it moved to a direct execution method. The loader we examined contained a specific netguid. With this, we found additional samples of the Kraken loader on VirusTotal:

Not only the loader had a specific netguid but the compiled versions of Kraken also shared a netguid, making it possible to continue hunting samples:

Comparing versions

Kraken uses a configuration file in every version to set the variables for the ransomware. This file is easily extracted for additional analysis.

Based on the config file we have discovered nine versions of Kraken:

  • 2
  • 3
  • 5
  • 5.2
  • 5.3
  • 6
  • 0
  • 0.4
  • 0.7

By extracting the config files from all the versions, we built the following overview of features. (The √ means the feature is present.)

All the versions we examined mostly contain the same options, changing only in some of them the antivirtual protection and antiforensic capabilities. The latest version, Kraken 2.0.7, changed its configuration scheme. We will cover that later in this article.

Other differences in Kraken’s config file include the list of countries excluded from encryption. The standouts are Brazil and Syria, which were not named in the original forum advertisement.

Having an exclusion list is a common method of cybercriminals to avoid prosecution. Brazil’s addition to the list in Version 1.5 suggests the involvement of a Brazilian affiliate. The following table shows the exclusion list by country and version. (The √ means the country appears on the list.)

All the Kraken releases have excluded the same countries, except for Brazil, Iran, and Syria.

Regarding Syria: We believe that the Kraken actors have had the same change of heart as the actors behind GandCrab, who recently released decryption keys for Syrian victims after a tweet claimed they had no money to pay the ransoms.

 

GandCrab’s change of heart regarding Syrian victims.

Version 2.0.7

The most recent version we examined comes with a different configuration scheme:

This release has more options. We expect this malware will be more configurable than other active versions.

APIs and statistics

One of the new features is a public API to track the number of victims:

Public API to track the number of victims. Source: Bleeping Computer.

Another API is a hidden service to track certain statistics:

 

The Onion URL can be found easily in the binary:

The endpoint and browser Kraken uses is hardcoded in the config file:

Kraken gathers the following information from every infection:

  • Status
  • Operating system
  • Username
  • Hardware ID
  • IP address
  • Country
  • City
  • Language
  • HDCount
  • HDType
  • HDName
  • HDFull
  • HDFree
  • Privilege
  • Operate
  • Beta

Kraken infrastructure

In Versions 1.2 through 2.04 Kraken contacts blasze[.]tk to download additional files. The site has Cloudflare protection to mitigate against DDoS attacks:

The domain is not accessible from many countries:

 

McAfee coverage

McAfee detects this threat with the following signatures:

  • Artemis!09D3BD874D9A
  • Artemis!475A697872CA
  • Artemis!71F510C40FE5
  • Artemis!99829D5483EF
  • Artemis!CE7606CFDFC0
  • Artemis!F1EE32E471A4
  • RDN/Generic.dx
  • RDN/Generic.tfr
  • RDN/Ransom

Indicators of compromise

Kraken loader hashes

  • 564154a2e3647318ca40a5ffa68d06b1bd40b606cae1d15985e3d15097b512cd
  • 53a28d3d29e655deca6702c98e71a9bd52a5a6de05524234ab362d27bd71a543

Kraken ransomware samples hashes

  • 047de76c965b9cf4a8671185d889438e4b6150326802e87470d20a3390aad304
  • 0b6cd05bee398bac0000e9d7032713ae2de6b85fe1455d6847578e9c5462391f
  • 159b392ec2c052a26d6718848338011a3733c870f4bf324863901ec9fbbbd635
  • 180406f298e45f66e205bdfb2fa3d8f6ead046feb57714698bdc665548bebc95
  • 1d7251ca0b60231a7dbdbb52c28709a6533dcfc4a339f4512955897c7bb1b009
  • 2467d42a4bdf74147ea14d99ef51774fec993eaef3c11694125a3ced09e85256
  • 2b2607c435b76bca395e4ef4e2a1cae13fe0f56cabfc54ee3327a402c4ee6d6f
  • 2f5dec0a8e1da5f23b818d48efb0b9b7065023d67c617a78cd8b14808a79c0dc
  • 469f89209d7d8cc0188654e3734fba13766b6d9723028b4d9a8523100642a28a
  • 4f13652f5ec4455614f222d0c67a05bb01b814d134a42584c3f4aa77adbe03d0
  • 564154a2e3647318ca40a5ffa68d06b1bd40b606cae1d15985e3d15097b512cd
  • 61396539d9392ae08b2c9836dd19a58efb541cf0381ea6fef28637aae63084ed
  • 67db0f639d5f4c021efa9c2b1db3b3bc85b2db920859dbded5fed661cc81282d
  • 713afc925973a421ff9328ff02c80d38575fbadaf27a1db0063b3a83813e8484
  • 7260452e6bd05725074ba92b9dc8734aec12bbf4bbaacd43eea9c8bbe591be27
  • 7747587608db6c10464777bd26e1abf02b858ef0643ad9db8134e0f727c0cd66
  • 7e0ee0e707db426eaf25bd0924631db969bb03dd9b13addffbcc33311a3b9aa7
  • 7fb597d2c8ed8726b9a982b2a84d1c9cc2af65345588d42dd50c8cebeee03dff
  • 85c75ac7af9cac6e2d6253d7df7a0c0eec6bdd71120218caeaf684da65b786be
  • 8a0320f3fee187040b1922c6e8bdf5d6bacf94e01b90d65e0c93f01e2abd1e0e
  • 97ed99508e2fae0866ad0d5c86932b4df2486da59fc2568fb9a7a4ac0ecf414d
  • 9c88c66f44eba049dcf45204315aaf8ba1e660822f9e97aec51b1c305f5fdf14
  • a33dab6d7adb83691bd14c88d7ef47fa0e5417fec691c874e5dd3918f7629215
  • b639e26a0f0354515870ee167ae46fdd9698c2f0d405ad8838e2e024eb282e39
  • cae152c9d91c26c1b052c82642670dfb343ce00004fe0ca5d9ebb4560c64703b
  • d316611df4b9b68d71a04ca517dbd94615a77a87f7a8c270d100ef9729a4e122
  • e39d5f664217bda0d95d126cff58ba707d623a58a750b53c580d447581f15af6
  • f7179fcff00c0ec909b615c34e5a5c145fedf8d9a09ed04376988699be9cc6d5
  • f95e74edc7ca3f09b582a7734ad7a547faeb0ccc9a3370ec58b9a27a1a6fd4a7
  • fea3023f06d0903a05096f1c9fc7113bea50b9923a3c024a14120337531180cd
  • ff556442e2cc274a4a84ab968006350baf9897fffd680312c02825cc53b9f455

Authentihash

  • 83b7ed1a0468394fc9661d07b9ad1b787f5e5a85512ae613f2a04a7442f21587
  • b821eb60f212f58b4525807235f711f11e2ef285630604534c103df74e3da81a
  • 0c4e0359c47a38e55d427894cc0657f2f73136cde9763bbafae37c916cebdd2a

Imphash

  • f34d5f2d4577ed6d9ceec516c1f5a744

Jabber

Email addresses found in the binaries and configuration files

Bitcoin address

  • 3MsZjBte81dvSukeNHjmEGxKSv6YWZpphH

PDBs found in the loader samples

  • C:\Users\Krypton\source\repos\UAC\UAC\obj\\Release\UAC.pdb

Associated Filenames

  • C:\ProgramData\Safe.exe C:\ProgramData\EventLog.txt # How to Decrypt Files.html
  • exe
  • exe
  • bat
  • <random>.bat
  • exe
  • exe
  • <random>.exe
  • exe
  • exe
  • exe
  • exe
  • exe
  • exe
  • exe
  • exe
  • exe
  • _exe
  • exe

Ransomware demo version

  • https://www76.zippyshare.com/v/5fMpcbdo/file[.]html

Kraken Unique Key

MITRE ATT&CK™ techniques

  • Data compressed
  • Email collection
  • File and directory
  • File deletion
  • Hooking
  • Kernel modules and extensions
  • Modify registry
  • Process injection
  • Query registry
  • Remote system
  • Security software
  • Service execution
  • System information
  • System time

Yara rules

 

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‘Operation Oceansalt’ Delivers Wave After Wave

A wall eight feet high with three strands of barbed wire is considered sufficient to deter a determined intruder, at least according to the advice offered by the CISSP professional certification. Although physical controls can be part of a multifaceted defense, an electronic attack affords the adversary time to develop the necessary tools to bypass …

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A wall eight feet high with three strands of barbed wire is considered sufficient to deter a determined intruder, at least according to the advice offered by the CISSP professional certification. Although physical controls can be part of a multifaceted defense, an electronic attack affords the adversary time to develop the necessary tools to bypass any logical wall set before them. In the latest findings from the McAfee Advanced Threat Research team, we examine an adversary that was not content with a single campaign, but launched five distinct waves adapted to their separate targets. The new report “Operation Oceansalt Attacks South Korea, U.S., and Canada with Source Code from Chinese Hacker Group” analyzes these waves and their victims, primarily in South Korea but with a few in the United States and Canada.

Although one reaction is to marvel at the level of innovation displayed by the threat actor(s), we are not discussing five new, never-before-seen malware variants—rather the reuse of code from implants seen eight years prior. The Oceansalt malware uses large parts of code from the Seasalt implant, which was linked to the Chinese hacking group Comment Crew. The level of reuse is graphically depicted below:

Code Visualization of Recent Oceansalt with Older Seasalt

Oceansalt, 2018.

Seasalt, 2010.

Who is Behind the Oceansalt Attack?

Originally taking the title APT1, the Comment Crew was seen as the threat actor conducting offensive cyber operations against the United States almost 10 years before. The obvious suspect is Comment Crew and, although this may seem a logical conclusion, we have not seen any activity from this group since they were initially exposed. Is it possible that this group has returned and, if so, why target South Korea?

It is possible that the source code developed by Comment Crew has now been used by another adversary. The code to our knowledge, however, has never been made public. Alternatively, this could be a “false flag” operation to suggest that we are seeing the re-emergence of Comment Crew. Creating false flags is a common practice.

What Really Matters

It is likely that reactions to this research will focus on debating the identity of the threat actor. Although this question is of great interest, answering it will require more than the technical evidence that private industry can provide. These limitations are frustrating. However, we can focus on the indicators of compromise presented in this report to detect, correct, and protect our systems, regardless of the source of these attacks.

Perhaps more important is the possible return of a previously dormant threat actor and, further, why should this campaign occur now? Regardless of whether this is a false flag operation to suggest the rebirth of Comment Crew, the impact of the attack is unknown. However, one thing is certain. Threat actors have a wealth of code available to leverage new campaigns, as previous research from the Advanced Threat Research team has revealed. In this case we see that collaboration not within a group but potentially with another threat actor—offering up considerably more malicious assets. We often talk about partnerships within the private and public sector as the key to tackling the cybersecurity challenges facing society. The bad actors are not putting these initiatives on PowerPoint slides and marketing material; they are demonstrating that partnerships can suit their ends, too.

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