VMware Releases Security Updates

Original release date: February 15, 2019

VMware has released security updates to address a vulnerability affecting multiple VMware products. An attacker could exploit this vulnerability to take control of an affected system.  The Cybersecurity a…

Original release date: February 15, 2019

VMware has released security updates to address a vulnerability affecting multiple VMware products. An attacker could exploit this vulnerability to take control of an affected system.  

The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) encourages users and administrators to review VMware Security Advisory VMSA-2019-0001 and apply the necessary updates.


This product is provided subject to this Notification and this Privacy & Use policy.


Mozilla Releases Security Update for Thunderbird

Original release date: February 14, 2019

Mozilla has released a security update to address vulnerabilities in Thunderbird. An attacker could exploit some of these vulnerabilities to take control of an affected system.The Cybersecurity and Infras…

Original release date: February 14, 2019

Mozilla has released a security update to address vulnerabilities in Thunderbird. An attacker could exploit some of these vulnerabilities to take control of an affected system.

The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) encourages users and administrators to review the Mozilla Security Advisory for Thunderbird 60.5.1 and apply the necessary update.


This product is provided subject to this Notification and this Privacy & Use policy.


Mozilla Releases Security Updates for Firefox

Original release date: February 12, 2019

Mozilla has released security updates to address vulnerabilities in Firefox and Firefox ESR. An attacker could exploit some of these vulnerabilities to take control of an affected system.The National Cybe…

Original release date: February 12, 2019

Mozilla has released security updates to address vulnerabilities in Firefox and Firefox ESR. An attacker could exploit some of these vulnerabilities to take control of an affected system.

The National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center (NCCIC), part of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), encourages users and administrators to review the Mozilla Security Advisories for Firefox 65.0.1 and Firefox ESR 60.5.1 and apply the necessary updates. 


This product is provided subject to this Notification and this Privacy & Use policy.


Researchers use Intel SGX to put malware beyond the reach of antivirus software

Processor protects malware from attempts to inspect and analyze it.

Intel Skylake die shot.

Intel Skylake die shot. (credit: Intel)

Researchers have found a way to run malicious code on systems with Intel processors in such a way that the malware can't be analyzed or identified by antivirus software, using the processor's own features to protect the bad code. As well as making malware in general harder to examine, bad actors could use this protection to, for example, write ransomware applications that never disclose their encryption keys in readable memory, making it substantially harder to recover from attacks.

The research, performed at Graz University of Technology by Michael Schwarz, Samuel Weiser, and Daniel Gruss (one of the researchers behind last year's Spectre attack), uses a feature that Intel introduced with its Skylake processors called SGX ("Software Guard eXtensions"). SGX enables programs to carve out enclaves where both the code and the data the code works with are protected to ensure their confidentiality (nothing else on the system can spy on them) and integrity (any tampering with the code or data can be detected). The contents of an enclave are transparently encrypted every time they're written to RAM and decrypted upon being read. The processor governs access to the enclave memory: any attempt to access the enclave's memory from code outside the enclave is blocked; the decryption and encryption only occurs for the code within the enclave.

SGX has been promoted as a solution to a range of security concerns when a developer wants to protect code, data, or both, from prying eyes. For example, an SGX enclave running on a cloud platform could be used to run custom proprietary algorithms, such that even the cloud provider cannot determine what the algorithms are doing. On a client computer, the SGX enclave could be used in a similar way to enforce DRM (digital rights management) restrictions; the decryption process and decryption keys that the DRM used could be held within the enclave, making them unreadable to the rest of the system. There are biometric products on the market that use SGX enclaves for processing the biometric data and securely storing it such that it can't be tampered with.

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