Georgia says switching back to all-paper voting is logistically impossible

In Curling v. Kemp, both sides are set to duke it out in court on Wednesday.

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Enlarge / A stack of voter access cards sit on a table at a polling location during the Georgia primary runoff elections in Atlanta, Georgia, on Tuesday, July 24, 2018. (credit: Elijah Nouvelage/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

A group of activists in Georgia has gone to court with a simple request to election officials: in the name of election security, do away with electronic voting entirely and let the more-than 6.1 million voters in the upcoming November 2018 election cast ballots entirely by paper. Georgia is just one of five American states that use purely digital voting without any paper record.

As part of this ongoing federal lawsuit, known as Curling v. Kemp, Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp's office says that such a change would be "reckless" with the election less than 60 days away. Plus, modifying the voting process would be too expensive, too unwieldy, and, in the end, not worth it.

"Plaintiffs raise only spectral fears that [Direct Recording Electronic machines] will be hacked and votes Miscounted," John Salter, an attorney representing the state, wrote in a recent court filing.

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Georgia says switching back to all-paper voting is logistically impossible

In Curling v. Kemp, both sides are set to duke it out in court on Wednesday.

Article intro image

Enlarge / A stack of voter access cards sit on a table at a polling location during the Georgia primary runoff elections in Atlanta, Georgia, on Tuesday, July 24, 2018. (credit: Elijah Nouvelage/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

A group of activists in Georgia has gone to court with a simple request to election officials: in the name of election security, do away with electronic voting entirely and let the more-than 6.1 million voters in the upcoming November 2018 election cast ballots entirely by paper. Georgia is just one of five American states that use purely digital voting without any paper record.

As part of this ongoing federal lawsuit, known as Curling v. Kemp, Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp's office says that such a change would be "reckless" with the election less than 60 days away. Plus, modifying the voting process would be too expensive, too unwieldy, and, in the end, not worth it.

"Plaintiffs raise only spectral fears that [Direct Recording Electronic machines] will be hacked and votes Miscounted," John Salter, an attorney representing the state, wrote in a recent court filing.

Read 18 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Georgia says switching back to all-paper voting is logistically impossible

In Curling v. Kemp, both sides are set to duke it out in court on Wednesday.

Article intro image

Enlarge / A stack of voter access cards sit on a table at a polling location during the Georgia primary runoff elections in Atlanta, Georgia, on Tuesday, July 24, 2018. (credit: Elijah Nouvelage/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

A group of activists in Georgia has gone to court with a simple request to election officials: in the name of election security, do away with electronic voting entirely and let the more-than 6.1 million voters in the upcoming November 2018 election cast ballots entirely by paper. Georgia is just one of five American states that use purely digital voting without any paper record.

As part of this ongoing federal lawsuit, known as Curling v. Kemp, Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp's office says that such a change would be "reckless" with the election less than 60 days away. Plus, modifying the voting process would be too expensive, too unwieldy, and, in the end, not worth it.

"Plaintiffs raise only spectral fears that [Direct Recording Electronic machines] will be hacked and votes Miscounted," John Salter, an attorney representing the state, wrote in a recent court filing.

Read 18 remaining paragraphs | Comments

32 class-action suits filed against Intel over Spectre and Meltdown flaws

Enlarge / This may become the new default imagery for Spectre and Meltdown around Intel. (credit: Brian Turner / Flickr)
In its annual SEC filing, Intel has revealed that it’s facing 32 lawsuits over the Spectre and Meltdown attacks on its processor…

Enlarge / This may become the new default imagery for Spectre and Meltdown around Intel. (credit: Brian Turner / Flickr)

In its annual SEC filing, Intel has revealed that it's facing 32 lawsuits over the Spectre and Meltdown attacks on its processors. While the Spectre problem is a near-universal issue faced by modern processors, the Meltdown attack is specific to processors from Intel and Apple, along with certain ARM designs that are coming to market shortly.

Per Intel's filing, 30 of the cases are customer class-action suits from users claiming to be harmed by the flaws. While Meltdown has effective workarounds, they come with some performance cost. Workarounds for Spectre are more difficult and similarly can harm system performance.

The other two cases are securities class actions that claim that Intel made misleading public statements during the six-month period after the company was notified of the problems but before the attacks were made public.

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