Windows 10 to get disposable sandboxes for dodgy apps

Enlarge (credit: F Delventhal)
Microsoft is building a new Windows 10 sandboxing feature that will let users run untrusted software in a virtualized environment that’s discarded when the program finishes running.
The new feature was revealed in a bu…

Enlarge (credit: F Delventhal)

Microsoft is building a new Windows 10 sandboxing feature that will let users run untrusted software in a virtualized environment that's discarded when the program finishes running.

The new feature was revealed in a bug-hunting quest for members of the Insider program and will carry the name "InPrivate Desktop." While the quest has now been removed, the instructions outlined the basic system requirements—a Windows 10 Enterprise system with virtualization enabled and adequate disk and memory—and briefly described how it would be used. There will be an InPrivate Desktop app in the store; running it will present a virtualized desktop environment that can be used to run questionable programs and will be destroyed when the window is closed.

While it would, of course, be possible to manually create a virtual machine to run software of dubious merit, InPrivate Desktop will streamline and automate that process, making it painless to run things in a safe environment. There's some level of integration with the host operating system—the clipboard can be used to transfer data, for example—but one assumes that user data is off limits, preventing data theft, ransomware, and similar nastiness.

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Apple vulnerabilities pose serious threat to passwords and credentials

Unpatched vulnerabilities in Mac OS X and iOS allow malicious apps to bypass security and steal credentials.

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Unpatched vulnerabilities in Mac OS X and iOS allow malicious apps to bypass security and steal credentials.

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Microsoft security sandbox for IE: Still broken after all these years

Four years later, a key IE defense against drive-by attacks is still easy to bypass.

There's a trivial way for drive-by exploit developers to bypass the security sandbox in almost all versions of Internet Explorer, and Microsoft says it has no immediate plans to fix it, according to researchers from Hewlett-Packard.

The exploit technique, laid out in a blog post published Thursday, significantly lowers the bar for attacks that surreptitiously install malware on end-user computers. Sandboxes like those included in IE and Google Chrome effectively require attackers to devise two exploits, one that pierces the sandbox and the other that targets a flaw in some other part of the browser. Having a reliable way to clear the first hurdle drastically lessens the burden of developing sophisticated attacks.

The bypass technique "does give the attacker a significant advantage by giving them higher-level access than a typical exploit might in Internet Explorer, by allowing them to escape the sandbox," Robert "Rsnake" Hansen, a vice president at security firm WhiteHat Labs, wrote in an e-mail to Ars. "In practical terms this is a very important finding, because it can be tied into existing exploits that might otherwise not be able to escape the IE sandbox."

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Sandboxie – Sandbox Your Browser / Software / Programs In Windows

Sandboxie enables you to easily sandbox your browser and other programs, it runs your applications in an isolated abstraction area called a sandbox. Under the supervision of Sandboxie, an application operates normally and at full speed, but can’t effect permanent changes to your computer. Instead, the changes are effected only in the…

Read the full post at darknet.org.uk

Sandboxie enables you to easily sandbox your browser and other programs, it runs your applications in an isolated abstraction area called a sandbox. Under the supervision of Sandboxie, an application operates normally and at full speed, but can’t effect permanent changes to your computer. Instead, the changes are effected only in the...

Read the full post at darknet.org.uk