Category: Windows 8

Oct 11 2017

Krebs on Security 2017-10-11 10:18:40

Microsoft on Tuesday released software updates to fix at least 62 security vulnerabilities in Windows, Office and other software. Two of those flaws were detailed publicly before yesterday’s patches were released, and one of them is already being exploited in active attacks, so attackers already have a head start.

brokenwindowsRoughly half of the flaws Microsoft addressed this week are in the code that makes up various versions of Windows, and 28 of them were labeled “critical” — meaning malware or malicious attackers could use the weaknesses to break into Windows computers remotely with no help from users.

One of the publicly disclosed Windows flaws (CVE-2017-8703) fixed in this batch is a problem with a feature only present in Windows 10 known as the Windows Subsystem for Linux, which allows Windows 10 users to run unmodified Linux binary files. Researchers at CheckPoint recently released some interesting research worth reading about how attackers might soon use this capability to bypass antivirus and other security solutions on Windows.

The bug quashed this week that’s being actively exploited resides in Microsoft Office (CVE-2017-11826), and Redmond says attackers could seize control over a vulnerable system just by convincing someone to open a booby-trapped Word file. Another Office vulnerability, (CVE-2017-11776), involves a flaw in Outlook’s ability to encrypt messages; SEC-Consult has more details on this bug.

Another critical flaw (CVE-2017-11779) addresses a scary vulnerability in the domain name system (DNS) component of Windows 8 and Windows Server 2012. According to research from Bishop Fox, the security firm credited with finding and reporting the bug, this flaw could be exploited quite easily to gain complete control over vulnerable systems if the attacker controls or compromises a local network (think Wi-Fi hotspot).

Normally, Adobe uses Microsoft’s Patch Tuesday (the second Tuesday of each month) to release its own fixes for Flash Player, Reader and other products. However, this time around the company has no security updates available. Adobe did release a new version of Flash that includes bug fixes (v. 27.0.0.159), but generally speaking only even-numbered Flash releases include security fixes.

For additional commentary on October’s bundle of updates from Microsoft, see these blogs from security vendors Ivanti and Qualys. For those looking for a straight-up list of which patches deserve priority, check out the always useful roundup from the SANS Internet Storm Center.

Dec 14 2016

Darknet – The Darkside 2016-12-14 09:38:19

Microsoft breaks network connectivity for many Windows 8 and 10 users just in time for Christmas – what a lovely gift. It’s related to the network stack (obviously) but seems to be specific to DHCP, so if you statically assign your LAN addresses (like most of us probably do) then you’ll be alright. And if […] The post Microsoft Breaks...

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Aug 31 2015

Microsoft accused of adding spy features to Windows 7, 8

Windows' network activity continues to be scrutinized amid privacy concerns. Windows 10 was first put under the microscope with both new and old features causing concern. With its Cortana digital personal assistant, Windows 10 represents a new breed of operating system that incorporates extensive online services as an integral part of the platform. But its older predecessors haven't escaped attention, and questions are now being asked of Windows 7 and 8's online connectivity.

Windows 8 included many of the same online features as are now raising hackles around the Internet. While it had no Cortana, it nonetheless integrated Web and local search, supported logging in and syncing settings with Microsoft Account, included online storage of encryption keys, and so on and so forth. While a few privacy advocates expressed concern at these features when the operating system was first released, the response was far more muted than the one we see today about Windows 10. But a new addition has led to accusations that Windows 8 now mimics one of Windows 10's more problematic features: it reports information to Microsoft even when told not to.

Back in April, Microsoft released a non-security update for both Windows 7 and 8. This update, 3022345, created a new Windows service called the Diagnostics Tracking service. Microsoft describes this service as doing two things. First, it increase the amount of diagnostic data that the Customer Experience Improvement Program (CEIP) can collect in order to better diagnose problems. Second, it collects data for third party applications that use the Application Insights service. Application Insights is a preview that allows app developers to track performance issues, crashes, and other problems of their applications. The Diagnostics Tracking service collects this data and sends it to Microsoft.

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May 20 2014

China bans Windows 8 on government PCs to ensure security

The Chinese government has banned the installation of Windows 8 on government PCs, reports Re/code. The Central Government Procurement Center issued a directive last week barring the use of Microsoft's latest operating system as an energy-saving measure, according to Re/code.

State news agency Xinhua gave a different reason for the ban: it's to ensure system security after Microsoft ended support for Windows XP. The unsupported operating system is still estimated to be used on as much as half of the Chinese desktop market.

How the ban makes sense, either as a security measure or an energy-saving one, isn't clear. Lest there be any doubt, the solution to Windows XP's security problems—it's vulnerable to a number of unpatched flaws already—is to stop using it. Not ban the use of an actively supported operating system.

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