As the Web moves toward HTTPS by default, Chrome will remove “secure” indicator

Enlarge (credit: Indigo girl / Flickr)
Back in February, Google announced its plans to label all sites accessed over regular unencrypted HTTP as “not secure,” starting in July. Today, the company described the next change it will make to its browser…

Enlarge (credit: Indigo girl / Flickr)

Back in February, Google announced its plans to label all sites accessed over regular unencrypted HTTP as "not secure," starting in July. Today, the company described the next change it will make to its browser: in September, Google will stop marking HTTPS sites as secure.

Before and after representation of the removed "Secure" label.

Before and after representation of the removed "Secure" label. (credit: Google)

The background to this change is the Web's gradual migration to the use of HTTPS rather than HTTP. With an ever-growing fraction of the Web being served over secure HTTPS—something now easy to do at zero cost thanks to the Let's Encrypt initiative—Google is anticipating a world where HTTPS is the default. In this world, only the occasional unsafe site should have its URL highlighted, not the boring and humdrum secure site.

Type data into the form and the "Not secure" message goes from gray to red.

Type data into the form and the "Not secure" message goes from gray to red. (credit: Google)

Most HTTP sites will get a regular gray "Not secure" label in their address bar. If the page has user input, however, that grey label will become red, indicating the particular risk the page represents: Web forms served up over HTTP could send their contents anywhere, making them risky places to type passwords or credit card numbers.

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From July on, Chrome will brand plain old HTTP as “Not secure”

Enlarge (credit: Indigo girl)
As more and more websites offer access over encrypted HTTPS, Chrome will soon brand any site served up over plain, unencrypted HTTP as “Not secure.” Chrome 68, due for release in July, will start sticking the “Not secur…

Enlarge (credit: Indigo girl)

As more and more websites offer access over encrypted HTTPS, Chrome will soon brand any site served up over plain, unencrypted HTTP as "Not secure." Chrome 68, due for release in July, will start sticking the "Not secure" label in the address bar, as a counterpart to the "Secure" label and padlock icon that HTTPS sites get.

This is a continuation of a change made in January of last year where Chrome would brand HTTP sites with password forms as being "Not secure."

Google says that 81 of the top 100 sites on the Web default to HTTPS and that 68 percent of Chrome traffic on Android and Windows uses HTTPS. As such, non-secure HTTP is becoming the exception, not the rule, justifying the explicit call-out. While HTTPS once required expensive certificates, projects such as Let's Encrypt have made it easy to add HTTPS to just about any site at zero cost.

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Google Chrome Marking ALL Non-HTTPS Sites Insecure July 2018

Google is ramping up its campaign against HTTP only sites and is going to mark ALL Non-HTTPS sites insecure in July 2018 with the release of Chrome 68. It’s a pretty strong move, but Google and the Internet, in general, has been moving in this directio…

Google Chrome Marking ALL Non-HTTPS Sites Insecure July 2018

Google is ramping up its campaign against HTTP only sites and is going to mark ALL Non-HTTPS sites insecure in July 2018 with the release of Chrome 68. It’s a pretty strong move, but Google and the Internet, in general, has been moving in this direction for a while.

It started with suggestions, then forced SSL on all sites behind logins, then mixed-content warnings, then showing HTTP sites are not-secured and now it’s going to be outright marked as insecure.

Read the rest of Google Chrome Marking ALL Non-HTTPS Sites Insecure July 2018 now! Only available at Darknet.

HTTPS Certificate Revocation is broken, and it’s time for some new tools

Enlarge / Damn computer hackers, always trying to steal all my stuff. (credit: Getty Images / C.J. Burton)
This article was originally published on Scott Helme’s blog and is reprinted here with his permission.
We have a little problem on the web rig…

Enlarge / Damn computer hackers, always trying to steal all my stuff. (credit: Getty Images / C.J. Burton)

This article was originally published on Scott Helme's blog and is reprinted here with his permission.

We have a little problem on the web right now and I can only see it becoming a larger concern as time goes by: more and more sites are obtaining certificates, vitally important documents needed to deploy HTTPS, but we have no way of protecting ourselves when things go wrong.

Certificates

We're currently seeing a bit of a gold rush for certificates on the Web as more and more sites deploy HTTPS. Beyond the obvious security and privacy benefits of HTTPS, there are quite a few reasons you might want to consider moving to a secure connection that I outline in my article Still think you don't need HTTPS?. Commonly referred to as "SSL certificates" or "HTTPS certificates", the wider Internet is obtaining them at a rate we've never seen before in the history of the web. Every day I crawl the top one million sites on the Web and analyze various aspects of their security and every 6 months I publish a report. You can see the reports here, but the main result to focus on right now is the adoption of HTTPS.

Not only are we continuing to deploy HTTPS, the rate at which we're doing so is increasing, too. This is what real progress looks like. The process of obtaining a certificate has become more and more simple over time and now, thanks to the amazing Let's Encrypt, it's also free to get them. Put simply, we send a Certificate Signing Request (CSR) to the Certificate Authority (CA) and the CA will challenge us to prove our ownership of the domain. This is usually done by setting a DNS TXT record or hosting a challenge code somewhere on a random path on our domain. Once this challenge has been satisfied the CA it issues the certificate and we can then present it to visitors' browsers and get the green padlock and "HTTPS" in the address bar.

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