xssless – An Automated XSS Payload Generator Written In Python

xssless is an automated XSS payload generator written in python. Usage Record request(s) with Burp proxy Select request(s) you want to generate, then right click and select “Save items” Use xssless to generate your payload: ./xssless.py burp_export_file Pwn! Features Automated XSS payload generation from imported Burp proxy requests...

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Malware attacks thousands of Yahoo.com visitors through Java exploit (Update)

On Friday, Netherlands-based security firm Fox IT reported that Yahoo.com's advertising network (ads.yahoo.com) was hacked and serving up malware to thousands of visitors during the last week. Fox IT believes Yahoo users were compromised as early as December 30, and the company estimates as of Friday that malicious materials were being delivered to roughly 300,000 visitors per hour—with nine percent (27,000) thought to be infected.

While infected, Yahoo's ad servers were reportedly sending visitors an "exploit kit." According to Fox IT, this would zero-in on vulnerabilities in Java to install various malware components on host computers. Fox IT has not yet identified a specific culprit, but the firm is confident the attack is financially motivated (with control of victim's machines possibly being sold to others).

The Washington Post spoke to two security researchers who confirmed the situation. Researcher and WaPo contributor Ashkan Soltani said it's possible the attack came from a direct hack, but the attackers may have also disguised the malware as regular ads that evaded Yahoo's filtering system. Either way, The Post noted the situation is just the most recent case of Java exploits in a year that was filled with them.

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How the NSA (may have) put a backdoor in RSA’s cryptography: A technical primer

Author Nick Sullivan worked for six years at Apple on many of its most important cryptography efforts before recently joining CloudFlare, where he is a systems engineer. He has a degree in mathematics from the University of Waterloo and a Masters in computer science with a concentration in cryptography from the University of Calgary. This post was originally written for the CloudFlare blog and has been lightly edited to appear on Ars.

There has been a lot of news lately about nefarious-sounding backdoors being inserted into cryptographic standards and toolkits. One algorithm, a pseudo-random bit generator, Dual_EC_DRBG, was ratified by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in 2007 and is attracting a lot of attention for having a potential backdoor. This is the algorithm that the NSA reportedly paid RSA $10 million in exchange for making it the default way for its BSAFE crypto toolkit to generated random numbers.

So how is that possible? This is a technical primer that explains what a backdoor is, how easy it can be to create your own, and the dangerous consequences of using a random number generator that was designed to have a backdoor. This is necessarily a long technical discussion, but hopefully by the end it should be clear why Dual_EC_DRBG has such a bad reputation.

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