FTC Warns of Online Dating Scams

Original release date: February 01, 2018

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has released an article addressing scams targeting online daters. In this type of fraud, cyber criminals target victims, gain their confidence, and trick them into sending money.

To stay safer online, review the FTC article on Online Dating Scams and the NCCIC/US-CERT tip on Staying Safe on Social Networking Sites. If you think you have been a victim of an online dating scam, report your experience to


This product is provided subject to this Notification and this Privacy & Use policy.


IC3 Warns of Impersonation Scams

Original release date: February 01, 2018

The Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) has released an alert on impersonation scams. In these schemes, scammers send emails impersonating IC3 to trick recipients into providing personally identifiable information or downloading malicious files. Users should use caution when reviewing unsolicited messages.

NCCIC/US-CERT encourages consumers to refer to the IC3 Alert and the NCCIC/US-CERT Tip on Avoiding Social Engineering and Phishing Attacks for more information.


This product is provided subject to this Notification and this Privacy & Use policy.


dorkbot – Command-Line Tool For Google Dorking

dorkbot – Command-Line Tool For Google Dorking

dorkbot is a modular command-line tool for Google dorking, which is performing vulnerability scans against a set of web pages returned by Google search queries in a given Google Custom Search Engine.

How dorkbot works

It is broken up into two sets of modules:

  • Indexers – modules that issue a search query and return the results as targets
  • Scanners – modules that perform a vulnerability scan against each target

Targets are stored in a local database file upon being indexed.

Read the rest of dorkbot – Command-Line Tool For Google Dorking now! Only available at Darknet.

Pyeongchang 2018: Staying Cyber Safe during the Olympics

Original release date: February 01, 2018

As the 2018 Olympic Games in Pyeongchang approach, NCCIC/US-CERT reminds travelers to be aware of cybersecurity risks. At high-profile events, cyber activists may take advantage of the large audience to spread their message. Cyber criminals may attempt to steal personally identifiable information or harvest users’ credentials for financial gain. There is also the possibility that mobile or other communications will be monitored.

NCCIC/US-CERT encourages users to protect themselves against these risks—especially risks associated with portable devices such as smart phones and tablets—by taking the following actions:

  • Switch off Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connections when not in use.
  • Use a credit card to pay for online goods and services.
  • When using a public or unsecured wireless connection, avoid using sites and applications that require personal information like log-ins.
  • Update mobile software.
  • Use strong PINs and passwords.

Using the security practices suggested in the resources listed below will also help travelers stay more secure in Pyeongchang and other travel destinations:


This product is provided subject to this Notification and this Privacy & Use policy.