Creating and Managing Strong Passwords

Original release date: March 27, 2018

NCCIC/US-CERT reminds users of the importance of creating and managing strong passwords. Passwords are often the only barrier between you and your personal information. There are several programs attackers can use to help guess or "crack" passwords. However, choosing strong passwords and keeping them confidential can make it more difficult for others to access your information.

NCCIC/US-CERT recommends users take the following actions:

  • Use multi-factor authentication when available.
  • Use different passwords on different systems and accounts.
  • Don't use passwords that are based on personal information that can be easily accessed or guessed.
  • Use the longest password or passphrase permissible by each password system.
  • Don't use words that can be found in any dictionary of any language.
  • Refer to Tips on Choosing and Protecting Passwords and Supplementing Passwords for best practices and additional information.

This product is provided subject to this Notification and this Privacy & Use policy.


OpenSSL Releases Security Updates

Original release date: March 27, 2018

OpenSSL has released security updates to address a vulnerability in previous versions of 1.1.0 and 1.0.2. An attacker could exploit this vulnerability to cause a denial-of-service condition.

NCCIC/US-CERT encourages users and administrators to review the OpenSSL Security Advisory and apply the necessary updates.


This product is provided subject to this Notification and this Privacy & Use policy.


Today’s Connected Cars Vulnerable to Hacking, Malware

The McAfee Advanced Threat Research team recently published an article about threats to automobiles on the French site JournalAuto.com. Connected cars are growing rapidly in number and represent the next big step in personal transportation. Auto sales are expected to triple between 2017 and 2022, to US$155.9 billion from $52.5 billion, according to PwC France. Realizing this increase is a huge challenge for car companies as well as for IT security firms.

Through multiple added functions, from Wi-Fi and external connections to driving assistance and autonomous operations, connected cars will very soon need strong security to avoid any intrusions that could endanger drivers, passengers, and others.

Security Risks

Modern cars are exposed to security risks just as are other connected devices. Let’s look at current and future threats in the automotive security field.

The following diagram shows the main risks: 

 

Personal Data and Tracking

Connected cars record a lot of information about their drivers. This information can come from an external device connected to the car, such as a phone, and can include contact details, SMS and calls history, and even musical tastes. A car can also record shifting patterns and other driver’s habits that could be used to create a picture of a driver’s competence. This kind of oversight could aid insurance companies when offering coverage, for example.

With personal data now considered the new gold, all of this information represents a valuable target for cybercriminals as well as companies and governments.

  • Cybercriminals can use this stolen information for financial compensation and identity theft
  • Companies can use this information for marketing or insurance contracts
  • Governments can use this information for spying on and tracking people

Faked Car Data

Digital information can be modified and faked. By altering data such as pollution tests or performance, companies can take advantage of the results to increase sales. Similarly, drivers could modify car statistics such as distance traveled to fool insurance companies or future buyers.

Car Theft and Key Fob Hacking

Key fob hacking is a technique to allow an intruder to enter a car without breaking in. This technique is widely known by attackers and can be done easily with cheap hardware. The attack consists of intercepting the signal from a wireless key to either block the signal to lock the car or replay the signal to gain access.

One variant of the attack uses a jammer to block the signal. The jammer interferes with the electromagnetic waves used to communicate with the vehicle, blocking the signal and preventing the car from locking, leaving access free to the attacker. Some jammers have a range of more than 500 meters.

Key fob jammer.

Another attack intercepts the signal sent by the key and replays it to open the door. Auto manufacturers protect against this kind of attack by implementing security algorithms that avoid simple replays with same signal. Each signal sent from the key to the car is unique, thus avoiding a replay. However, one proof of concept for this attack blocks the signal to the car and stores it. The driver’s first click on the key does not work but is recorded by the attacker. The driver’s second click is also recorded, locking the car but giving two signals to the attackers. The first signal recorded, which the car has not received, is used to unlock the door. The second signal is stored for the attacker to use later.

Entering by the (CAN) Back Door

Autos use several components to interact with their parts. Since the end of the 20th century, cars have used the dedicated controller area network (CAN) standard to allow microcontrollers and devices to talk to each other. The CAN bus communicates with a vehicle’s electronic control unit (ECU), which operates many subsystems such as antilock brakes, airbags, transmission, audio system, doors, and many other parts—including the engine. Modern cars also have an On-Board Diagnostic Version 2 (OBD-II) port. Mechanics use this port to diagnose problems. CAN traffic can be intercepted from the OBD port.

The on-board diagnostic port.

An external OBD device could be plugged into a car as a backdoor for external commands, controlling services such as the Wi-Fi connection, performance statistics, and unlocking doors. The OBD port offers a path for malicious activities if not secured.

Spam and Advertising

Adding more services to connected cars can also add more security risks. With the arrival of fully connected autos such as Teslas, which allow Internet access from a browser, it is feasible to deliver a new type of spam based on travel and geolocation. Imagine a pop-up discount as you approach a fast-food restaurant. Not only is this type of action likely to be unwanted, it could also provide a distraction to drivers. We already know spam and advertising are infection vectors for malware.

Malware and Exploits

All the ECUs in an auto contain firmware that can be hacked. Cars employ in-vehicle infotainment (IVI) systems to control audio or video among other functions. These systems are increasing in complexity.

An in-vehicle infotainment system.

MirrorLink, Bluetooth, and internal Wi-Fi are other technologies that improve the driving experience. By connecting our smartphones to our cars, we add functions such as phone calls, SMS, and music and audiobooks, for example.

Malware can target these devices. Phones, browsers, or the telecommunication networks embedded in our cars are infection vectors that can allow the installation of malware. In 2016, McAfee security researchers demonstrated a ransomware proof of concept that blocked the use of the car until the ransom was paid.

A proof-of-concept IVI ransomware attack on a vehicle.

The ransomware was installed via an over-the-air system that allowed the connection of external equipment.

Third-Party Apps  

Many modern cars allow third parties to create applications to further connected services. For example, it is possible to unlock or lock the door from your smartphone using an app. Although these apps can be very convenient, they effectively open these services to anyone and can become a new attack vector. It is easier to hack a smartphone app than a car’s ECU because the former is more affordable and offers many more resources. Car apps are also vulnerable because some third parties employ weak security practices and credentials are sometimes stored in clear text. These apps may also store personal information such as GPS data, car model, and other information. This scenario has already been demonstrated by the OnStar app that allowed a hacker to remotely open a car.

Vehicle-to-Vehicle Communications

Vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) technology allows communications between vehicles on the road, using a wireless network. This technology can aid security on the road by reducing a car’s speed when another vehicle is too close, for example. It can also communicate with road sign devices (vehicle to infrastructure). That transmitted information improves the driving experience as well as the security. Now imagine this vector invaded by destructive malware. If the V2V system becomes a vector, a malicious actor could create malware to infect many connected cars. This sounds like a sci-fi scenario, right? Yet it is not, if we compare this possibility with recent threats such as WannaCry or NotPetya that targeted computers with destructive malware. It is not hard to predict such a nightmare scenario.

Conclusion

Connected cars are taking over the roads and will radically change how we move about. By enhancing the customer experience, the automotive and the tech industries will provide exciting new services. Nonetheless, we need to consider the potential risks, with security implemented sooner rather than later. Some of the scenarios in this post are already used in the wild; others could happen sooner than we expect.

References

The post Today’s Connected Cars Vulnerable to Hacking, Malware appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

DHS And FBI Issue Joint Warning – Hackers Have Targeted Critical Sector Industries Since March 2016

On March 15, 2018, the US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) issued a joint Technical Alert (TA18-074A) warning “network defenders” in critical sector industries that “Russian government cyber actors” have been intentionally targeting U.S. government entities and organizations in the energy, nuclear, commercial facilities, water, aviation, and critical manufacturing sectors since at least March 2016. These threat actors, according to the joint alert, have used this campaign to engage in reconnaissance missions and to obtain operational control of industrial control processes and systems.

The joint alert identifies two targets of the ongoing attack: “staging” and “intended” targets. Staging targets are those “peripheral organizations such as trusted third-party suppliers with less secure networks.” The threat actors use the “staging” targets’ networks as “pivot points and malware repositories when targeting their final intended victims,” the intended targets. Once compromised, the staging targets are used to download source code from intended targets’ websites and to remotely access infrastructure such as corporate web-based email and virtual private network (VPN) connections. The threat actors ultimately seek to gain information from the intended target on “network and organizational design and control system capabilities within organizations.”

The joint alert identifies a variety of tactics used by the threat actors, including spear-phishing campaigns, watering-hole domain attacks, and collecting publicly available information:

  • Spear-Phishing. Through spear-phishing, the threat actors use email attachments to leverage legitimate Microsoft Office functions for retrieving a document from a remote server, which allows the threat actor to gain access to user credentials. With user credentials, and using a password-cracking technique, “the threat actors are able to masquerade as authorized users in environments that use single-factor authentication.”
  • Watering-Hole. Through watering-hole attacks, the threat actors compromise “the infrastructure of trusted organizations to reach intended targets. Approximately half of the known watering holes are trade publications and informational websites related to process control, ICS, or critical infrastructure.” These watering-holes host legitimate content developed by reputable organizations, but the threat actor alters the website to contain and reference malicious content. The threat actors use legitimate credentials to access and directly modify the website content. Once on the website, the victim provides credentials.
  • Public Information. The threat actors review information “posted to company websites, especially information that may appear to be innocuous, [to gain access to] operationally sensitive information.” In one example, the threat actors downloaded a small photo from a publicly accessible human resources page, which when expanded was “a high-resolution photo that displayed control systems equipment models and status information in the background.”

Once threat actors gain access to the network, the DHS and FBI warn they conduct “reconnaissance operations within the network,” including “identifying and browsing file servers within the intended victim’s network.” Perhaps most troubling, the DHS and FBI identified in multiple instances “the threat actors accessed workstations and servers on a corporate network that contained data output from control systems within energy generation facilities.” This access would allow the threat actors to control operations within the organization, including control of certain energy sectors.

Takeaways

The new joint alert highlights the dynamic threat landscape facing organizations. Although the alert provides technical advice concerning the identification and deterrence of the ongoing attacks, it also provides best practices applicable to the campaign. Many of the recommendations apply outside of the critical sector industries, and provide a timely reminder that all organizations should review their cybersecurity practices and policies on an ongoing basis. Some of the recommended best practices include:

  • Reviewing your existing third party contracts to determine cybersecurity vulnerabilities and protections;
  • Monitoring VPN logs for abnormal activity;
  • Deploying web and email filters on the network;
  • Ensuring proper training to inform end users on proper email and web usage;
  • Establishing a complex password policy;
  • Using multi-factor authentication;
  • Assigning appropriate personnel to review logs;
  • Completing “independent security (as opposed to compliance) risk review”; and
  • Preparing a robust incident response plan.

If you or your organization is looking to create new, or update existing cybersecurity policies or practices, or you have any questions about this joint alert and how your organization may be impacted, please reach out to the Dentons cybersecurity team to discuss how our cost effective strategies can help mitigate your risk and provide an assessment of your overall cybersecurity readiness.

Dentons is the world’s largest law firm, a leader on the Acritas Global Elite Brand Index, a BTI Client Service 30 Award winner, and recognized by prominent business and legal publications for its innovations in client service, including founding Nextlaw Labs and the Nextlaw Global Referral NetworkThe Dentons Privacy and Cybersecurity Group operates at the intersection of technology and law, and has been singled out as one of the law firms best at cybersecurity by corporate counsel, according to BTI Consulting Group.