Microsoft’s latest security service uses human intelligence, not artificial

Microsoft security experts monitoring the world, looking for hackers.

Enlarge / Microsoft security experts monitoring the world, looking for hackers. (credit: Microsoft)

Microsoft has announced two new cloud services to help administrators detect and manage threats to their systems. The first, Azure Sentinel, is very much in line with other cloud services: it's dependent on machine learning to sift through vast amounts of data to find a signal among all the noise. The second, Microsoft Threat Experts, is a little different: it's powered by humans, not machines.

Azure Sentinel is a machine learning-based Security Information and Event Management that takes the (often overwhelming) stream of security events—a bad password, a failed attempt to elevate privileges, an unusual executable that's blocked by anti-malware, and so on—and distinguishes between important events that actually deserve investigation and mundane events that can likely be ignored.

Sentinel can use a range of data sources. There are the obvious Microsoft sources—Azure Active Directory, Windows Event Logs, and so on—as well as integrations with third-party firewalls, intrusion-detection systems, endpoint anti-malware software, and more. Sentinel can also ingest any data source that uses ArcSight's Common Event Format, which has been adopted by a wide range of security tools.

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Cisco Releases Security Updates

Original release date: February 27, 2019

Cisco has released security updates to address vulnerabilities in multiple Cisco products. A remote attacker could exploit one of these vulnerabilities to take control of an affected system.

The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) encourages users and administrators to review the following Cisco Advisories and apply the necessary updates:


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National Consumer Protection Week

Original release date: February 27, 2019

National Consumer Protection Week (NCPW) is March 3–9. This annual event encourages individuals and businesses to learn about their consumer rights and how to keep themselves secure. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and its NCPW partners provide free resources to protect consumers from fraud, scams, and identity theft.

The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) encourages consumers to review FTC’s NCPW resource page, participate in the NCPW Twitter chats and Facebook Live event, and review the following CISA tips:


This product is provided subject to this Notification and this Privacy & Use policy.


What are the MOST Critical Web Vulnerabilities in 2019?

What are the MOST Critical Web Vulnerabilities in 2019?

So what is wild on the web this year? Need to know about the most critical web vulnerabilities in 2019 to protect your organization?

Well luckily for you Acunetix compiles an annual web application vulnerability report which is a fairly hefty piece of analysis on data gathered from the previous year. This is compiled from the automated web and network perimeter scans run on the Acunetix Online platform, over a 12 month period, across more than 10,000 scan targets.

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