How the CIA infects air-gapped networks

Enlarge / A configuration screen found in the Drifting Deadline exploit. (credit: WikiLeaks)

Documents published Thursday purport to show how the Central Intelligence Agency has used USB drives to infiltrate computers so sensitive they are severed from the Internet to prevent them from being infected.

More than 150 pages of materials published by WikiLeaks describe a platform code-named Brutal Kangaroo that includes a sprawling collection of components to target computers and networks that aren't connected to the Internet. Drifting Deadline was a tool that was installed on computers of interest. It, in turn, would infect any USB drive that was connected. When the drive was later plugged into air-gapped machines, the drive would infect them with one or more pieces of malware suited to the mission at hand. A Microsoft representative said none of the exploits described work on supported versions of Windows.

The infected USB drives were at least sometimes able to infect computers even when users didn't open any files. The so-called EZCheese exploit, which was neutralized by a patch Microsoft appears to have released in 2015, worked anytime a malicious file icon was displayed by the Windows explorer. A later exploit known as Lachesis used the Windows autorun feature to infect computers running Windows 7. Lachesis didn't require Explorer to display any icons, but the drive of the drive letter the thrumbdrive was mounted on had to be included in a malicious link. The RiverJack exploit, meanwhile, used the Windows library-ms function to infect computers running Windows 7, 8, and 8.1. Riverjack worked only when a library junction was viewed in Explorer.

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WikiLeaks says CIA’s “Pandemic” implant turns servers into malware carriers

Enlarge / One of the pages published Thursday in WikiLeaks' latest Vault 7 release. (credit: WikiLeaks)

WikiLeaks just published details of a purported CIA operation that turns Windows file servers into covert attack machines that surreptitiously infect computers of interest inside a targeted network.

"Pandemic," as the implant is codenamed, turns file servers into a secret carrier of whatever malware CIA operatives want to install, according to documents published Thursday by WikiLeaks. When targeted computers attempt to access a file on the compromised server, Pandemic uses a clever bait-and-switch tactic to surreptitiously deliver malicious version of the requested file. The Trojan is then executed by the targeted computers. A user manual said Pandemic takes only 15 seconds to be installed. The documents didn't describe precisely how Pandemic would get installed on a file server.

In a note accompanying Thursday's release, WikiLeaks officials wrote:

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WikiLeaks says CIA’s “Pandemic” implant turns servers into malware carriers

Enlarge / One of the pages published Thursday in WikiLeaks' latest Vault 7 release. (credit: WikiLeaks)

WikiLeaks just published details of a purported CIA operation that turns Windows file servers into covert attack machines that surreptitiously infect computers of interest inside a targeted network.

"Pandemic," as the implant is codenamed, turns file servers into a secret carrier of whatever malware CIA operatives want to install, according to documents published Thursday by WikiLeaks. When targeted computers attempt to access a file on the compromised server, Pandemic uses a clever bait-and-switch tactic to surreptitiously deliver malicious version of the requested file. The Trojan is then executed by the targeted computers. A user manual said Pandemic takes only 15 seconds to be installed. The documents didn't describe precisely how Pandemic would get installed on a file server.

In a note accompanying Thursday's release, WikiLeaks officials wrote:

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Evidence suggests Russia behind hack of French president-elect

Enlarge / A last-minute information operation against French presidential candidate Emmanuel Macron did not stop him from winning Sunday's run-off election. But it did have the fingerprints of Russia all over it. (credit: Getty Images/ Chesnot )

Late on May 5 as the two final candidates for the French presidency were about to enter a press blackout in advance of the May 7 election, nine gigabytes of data allegedly from the campaign of Emmanuel Macron were posted on the Internet in torrents and archives. The files, which were initially distributed via links posted on 4Chan and then by WikiLeaks, had forensic metadata suggesting that Russians were behind the breach—and that a Russian government contract employee may have falsified some of the dumped documents.

Even WikiLeaks, which initially publicized the breach and defended its integrity on the organization's Twitter account, has since acknowledged that some of the metadata pointed directly to a Russian company with ties to the government:

Evrika ("Eureka") ZAO is a large information technology company in St. Petersburg that does some work for the Russian government, and the group includes the Federal Security Service of the Russian Federation (FSB) among its acknowledged customers (as noted in this job listing). The company is a systems integrator, and it builds its own computer equipment and provides "integrated information security systems." The metadata in some Microsoft Office files shows the last person to have edited the files to be "Roshka Georgiy Petrovich," a current or former Evrika ZAO employee.

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