UPS says 51 stores infected with credit card stealing malware

Dozens of UPS stores across 24 states, including California, Georgia, New York, and Nebraska, have been hit by malware designed to suck up credit card details. The UPS Store, Inc., is a subsidiary of UPS, but each store is independently owned and operated as a licensed franchisee.

In an announcement posted Wednesday to its website, UPS said that 51 locations, or around one percent of its 4,470 franchised stores across the country, were found to have been penetrated by a “broad-based malware intrusion.” The company recorded approximately 105,000 transactions at those locations, but does not know the precise number of cardholders affected.

UPS did not say precisely how such data was taken, but given the recent breaches at hundreds of supermarkets nationwide, point-of-sale hacks at Target, and other major retailers, such systems would be a likely attack vector. Earlier this month, a Wisconsin-based security firm also reported that 1.2 billion usernames and passwords had been captured by a Russian criminal group.

Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Latest Gameover botnet lays low, looking to resist takedown

In early July, a group of cyber criminals released a modified version of the Gameover ZeuS banking trojan, using a technique known as a domain generation algorithm (DGA) to make disrupting the botnet more difficult.

But the same technique has made it easier for researchers to track the botnet's activity, and they watched as it quickly grew from infecting hundreds of initial systems to 10,000 systems in two weeks. Then a funny thing happened: Gameover ZeuS stopped growing. Now, almost six weeks after researchers first detected signs of the program, the group behind the botnet keeps the infections between 3,000 and 5,000 systems, according to security services firm Seculert.

The group undoubtedly wants to grow the botnet again because cyber crime is typically a game of large numbers. When a coalition of law enforcement officials and industry players took down the botnet in late May, it comprised some 500,000 to 1 million machines. Now they're laying low, Seculert CTO Aviv Raff told Ars.

Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Researchers find it’s terrifyingly easy to hack traffic lights

A typical intersection configuration.

Taking over a city’s intersections and making all the lights green to cause chaos is a pretty bog-standard Evil Techno Bad Guy tactic on TV and in movies, but according to a research team at the University of Michigan, doing it in real life is within the realm of anyone with a laptop and the right kind of radio. In a paper published this month, the researchers describe how they very simply and very quickly seized control of an entire system of almost 100 intersections in an unnamed Michigan city from a single ingress point.

The exercise was conducted on actual stoplights deployed at live intersections, "with cooperation from a road agency located in Michigan." As is typical in large urban areas, the traffic lights in the subject city are networked in a tree-type topology, allowing them to pass information to and receive instruction from a central management point. The network is IP-based, with all the nodes (intersections and management computers) on a single subnet. In order to save on installation costs and increase flexibility, the traffic light system uses wireless radios rather than dedicated physical networking links for its communication infrastructure—and that’s the hole the research team exploited.

Wireless security? What's that?

The systems in question use a combination of 5.8GHz and 900MHz radios, depending on the conditions at each intersection (two intersections with a good line-of-sight to each other use 5.8GHz because of the higher data rate, for example, while two intersections separated by obstructions would use 900MHz). The 900MHz links use "a proprietary protocol with frequency hopping spread-spectrum (FHSS)," but the 5.8GHz version of the proprietary protocol isn’t terribly different from 802.11n.

Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Heartbleed Implicated In US Hospital Leak

If you’ve been up on your news consumption in the past week or so, you’ll have read about the Chinese hackers who managed to access 4.5 million patient records in a huge US Hospital Leak. Community Health Systems hacked, records of nearly 4.5 million patients stolen Now it turns out, the first entry for this [...] The post Heartbleed...

Read the full post at darknet.org.uk